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Understanding 3D Space
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  • CG101
  • 2m 16s
Papa Georgio

Pluralsight

Papa Georgio
[MUSIC PLAYING] In this lesson we will learn about 3D space, and how the computer keeps track of an object. An understanding of 3D space-- or three dimensional space-- is important to 3D animation because well they're both in 3D. But what does that mean? Without getting into a boring and complicated mathematical definition, each dimension describes one part of an object's position as a number. These numbers are stored in an object's attributes. And attributes can store anything from an object's name to its current location. Let's start with the simplest example, animating in one dimension. This restricts our object to moving only along a flat line, and this is very limiting. So let's add a second dimension. Now by doing this, we can now move up and down as well as left and right. Finally we'll add the third dimension, and now our object can move anywhere. This may seem confusing, but it will quickly become second nature to think like this because we live in a 3D space. If we pick up the ball, we can move it left, right, up, down, towards us, and away from us. But there's a problem with saying we can move it left and right. Because what if our view changes? What was left a second ago, is now right. Luckily mathematicians have given us a handy guide to describing 3D space, by breaking the three dimensions in two three axis. Let's move our view back to where we started. Now if we move the object left and right, we can say we are moving it on the x-axis. Moving it up and down, is the y-axis. You can probably guess what the third axis is called. It's the z-axis. Notice that the x-axis can no longer be described as left and right. But if you say move positive in the x-axis, it's easy to know where it will go. In this lesson we learned about 3D space, the three different axis, and how the computer tracks our objects using values. In the next lesson, we will learn different ways to manipulate objects in 3D space. [MUSIC PLAYING]
With this tutorial, we will take a software independent look at some of the vital terminology that is required to build a solid foundation for learning how to animate 3D models.

The purpose of these standalone lessons is not to learn how to use any specific software, but rather to focus on learning fundamental terminology. It is recommended that you are familiar with all of the terminology that is discussed throughout these Visual Guide lessons before starting to follow along with any animation tutorials.

Explore more with our free resource on Common Terminology for 3D Animation
Introduction and Project Overview
1

Introduction and Project Overview

 
01:19
Basics of Computer Animation
2

Basics of Computer Animation

 
01:16
Understanding 3D Space
3

Understanding 3D Space

 
02:16
Transforming 3D Objects
4

Transforming 3D Objects

 
02:12
Understanding Time in Animation
5

Understanding Time in Animation

 
02:38
Creating Animation with Keyframes
6

Creating Animation with Keyframes

 
03:18
Animation Editors: the Dopesheet
7

Animation Editors: the Dopesheet

 
02:07
Animation Editors: the Graph Editor
8

Animation Editors: the Graph Editor

 
02:38
Understanding Tangent Handles
9

Understanding Tangent Handles

 
02:04
Interpolation Types and Ghosting
10

Interpolation Types and Ghosting

 
02:49
Creating Repeating Animation using Cycling
11

Creating Repeating Animation using Cycling

 
02:06
Camera Animation and Motion Paths
12

Camera Animation and Motion Paths

 
01:36
Understanding Rigging
13

Understanding Rigging

 
02:15
Understanding Constraints
14

Understanding Constraints

 
02:09
Understanding Deformers
15

Understanding Deformers

 
01:15
Understanding Bones and Skinning
16

Understanding Bones and Skinning

 
01:47
Hierarchies and Forward Kinematics
17

Hierarchies and Forward Kinematics

 
01:44
Inverse Kinematics
18

Inverse Kinematics

 
03:01
Understanding Expressions
19

Understanding Expressions

 
03:48
Character Animation
20

Character Animation

 
01:37
Understanding Morph Shapes
21

Understanding Morph Shapes

 
01:55
Understanding Non-Linear Animation
22

Understanding Non-Linear Animation

 
02:36
Understanding Motion Capture
23

Understanding Motion Capture

 
02:40
Breakdown and In-between Keys
24

Breakdown and In-between Keys

 
01:52
Interpolation
25

Interpolation

 
02:03
Pivot Point
26

Pivot Point

 
01:44
Control Curves
27

Control Curves

 
01:38
Set-Driven Keys
28

Set-Driven Keys

 
02:27
Baking Simulations
29

Baking Simulations

 
01:46
Channel Box
30

Channel Box

 
01:39