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Linear Perspective
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  • CG101
  • 2m 9s
Papa Georgio

Pluralsight

Papa Georgio
[MUSIC PLAYING] In this lesson, we will learn about linear perspective. One challenge that traditional artists constantly face is the accurate representation of a three dimensional object on a two dimensional plane. This proves to be a challenge because one small error will cause the drawn object to look off thus breaking the three dimensional illusion. Because of this, a number of different drawing systems have been devised to help artists represent three dimensions on a flat surface. The most popular these systems is known as linear perspective. Linear perspective-- also referred to as a vanishing point based system-- is the method of portraying a three dimensional object or scene in a two dimensional space. In linear perspective, parallel lines-- or edges of an object that are horizontal in nature-- appear to recede and converge into the background. The point at which these parallel lines converge to is known as a vanishing point. This helps to create the illusion that our apparent object is receding back into space. The resulting visual distortion on the size of an object is known as forshortening and can make an object appear shorter than it really is. Linear perspective does not always use one vanishing point. Depending on the viewing angle, linear perspective can use one, two, or three vanishing points. In a one or two point perspective, the vanishing points always sit on what's referred to as a horizon line. While it's not always visible in a scene, this horizon line is always eye level to the viewer and represents an infinite amount of distance. In a three point perspective, the third vanishing point is placed either above or below the horizon line and is where all vertical lines in a perspective drawing will converge. Adding a third vanishing point allows an artist to portray either a viewing angle above or below an object or scene. By following the simple rules of linear perspective, an artist can accurately draw believable three dimensional objects. So when setting out to draw object or scene, think about setting it up first using a one, two, or three point perspective. [MUSIC PLAYING]
With this tutorial, we will take a software independent look at some of the vital terminology that is required to build a solid foundation for learning some basics of graphic design. The purpose of these standalone lessons is not to learn how to use any specific software, but rather to focus on learning fundamental terminology. It is recommended that you are familiar with all of the terminology that is discussed throughout these lessons before starting to follow along with any graphic design tutorials.
Anti-Aliasing
1

Anti-Aliasing

 
01:31
Letter Spacing
2

Letter Spacing

 
03:17
Process Color
3

Process Color

 
02:40
Spot Color Printing
4

Spot Color Printing

 
02:51
Knockouts
5

Knockouts

 
01:45
Visual Hierarchy
6

Visual Hierarchy

 
02:20
Linear Perspective
7

Linear Perspective

 
02:09